ISSN 1866-8836
Клеточная терапия и трансплантация

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Expert opinion

Expert opinion

Will new drugs cure acute myeloid leukaemia?

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Robert Peter Gale MD

Centre for Haematology, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Imperial College London, London, UK


Correspondence:
Robert Peter Gale MD, PhD, DSc (hc), FACP, FRCPI (hon), FRSM, Centre for Haematology Research, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Imperial College London, London, UK SW7 2AZ
Phone: +1 908 656 0484
Fax: +1 310 388 1320
E-Mail: robertpetergale@alumni.ucla.edu

Citation: Gale RP. Will new drugs cure acute myeloid leukaemia? Cell Ther Transplant 2021; 10(3-4): 4-7.

There are many new therapies approved to treat acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) including conventional and targeted drugs, and immune therapy. Most improve diverse outcomes including event- and relapse-free survivals and survival. However, most effect sizes are small and failure rates by 2 years are high. Based on the data reviewed above I conclude: (1) many new AML therapies target specific AML sub-types; (2) none are proved better than intensive radiochemotherapy in persons who could receive either therapy; (3) there is disagreement defining who can or cannot receive intensive therapy; (4) there are important problems with several new drug approvals; (5) azacitidine and venetoclax may be the new standard-of-care in elderly persons with AML judged unable to receive intensive therapy; and (6) new drugs are welcome but have not had a big impact on long-term survival of most people with AML.

Keywords

Acute myeloid leukemia, targeted therapy, efficiency.